INTERGENERATIONAL CREATIVITY GATHERINGS: 

 CELEBRATING THE CREATIVE SPIRIT (1–7 days)  

Community Works began incorporating socially engaged art into our development work over a decade ago. Since that time, we have witnessed on many occasions its capacity to support collective healing and well-being and engage communities in the process of exploring critical social concerns.

 

In partnership with local and visiting artists, we have delivered a range of initiatives that use traditional and contemporary art, audio art, music, photography,  video, and theatre to create intergenerational exchange, address issues relating to violence and addiction, and assist individuals and communities with histories of trauma to tell their stories.  As participants join in creative expression, a safe and inclusive space opens up in which everyone feels welcome - gang-involved and at-risk youth, adult mentors, isolated elders, and the community at large.

 

We have organized creativity workshops and gatherings on the land in the summer and in schools and community centres in the winter.  They have ranged from a one-day to a week-long event.

 

Community Works is particularly supportive of inter-generational creativity gatherings. We believe that the health of our communities and the world in general depends on our ability to bridge the distance that separates the young and the old in today’s world. Collective art-making forms a solid bridge for us all to cross.  

 

If your organization would like to host a creativity gathering, CONTACT US to discuss options. 

Elder and youth share the pleasure of doing beadwork.

We want the generations mixed together so that the young can give the old joy and the old can give the young wisdom. As we get older, we sense more the importance of connecting old to young, family member to family member, neighbour to neighbour, and even the living to the dead. In connection is truth, beauty, and ultimately salvation. Connection is what makes life bearable for us humans.  

 

- Mary Pipher, Another Country (1999, pg. 321) 

Designed by Adam Fainman